Articles Tagged with temporary orders

“I have to move, but my ex-spouse still lives here. Can I take my kids?”

This is a question that we hear fairly often here at Guest and Gray. Many people find themselves having to relocate for work or the need to be closer to family. However, for divorced parents, this problem is exacerbated by geographic restrictions that say where there children must live. These are known as “Geographic Restrictions”

Geographic restrictions most often place restrictions on the county in which you may live, or the maximum distance from the other parent that you may live. These restrictions are either negotiated by the parties or provided by court order. This means that if you want to relocate out of your geographic area, you have to go to court again and explain the reasons for your relocation.

Filing for a divorce can be a scary task because not many people know the law, or they’ve heard several things about what could happen, but aren’t sure if it’s true. It’s an unknown territory and can be difficult to maneuver on your own. This is why it’s important to have a concise explanation about each step in the process, to ensure that you’re informed and can be prepared.

• Step One: Filing

You’ve hired your attorney at Guest & Gray, P.C. to handle your divorce. The first step is to file what is called the Original Petition of Divorce which lays out all of the information on your divorce such as the dates of your marriage and separation, the grounds for your divorce (insupportability is standard but there can be other reasons such as adultery), whether there are any children of the marriage, and division of the community property.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, “in 2009, 14 states had divorce rates for men that were significantly above the U.S. average, ranging from 10.0 to 13.5 per 1,000” which included Texas.

Divorce is present throughout our state and it is a difficult and emotional process. But, it’s even more difficult when there are children involved. All parents worry about the choices they make and how those choices will effect their children. Divorce is no exception. And, parents have every right to worry–research indicates that the manner in which parents handle divorce can have a direct effect on children’s adjustments.

But, parents, don’t fret because there are healthy and helpful ways to deal with these effects and the divorce process. In fact, many family clients of attorneys are not only urged but also required to take parenting classes that focus on these issues–how is the divorce effecting your child, how can you talk to your child about the effects of divorce, how to manage the divorce process without placing the child in the middle of the parents, how to maintain the relationship you have with your children despite the changes in your lives, etc. One such class is called “For Kids’ Sake” and it is taught by a psychologist trained and educated in these particular fields.

Temporary Orders arise in several situations. In divorce cases, either you’ve recently filed for divorce or been served with a petition for divorce. In suits affecting the parent-child relationship, temporary orders can arise in the initial proceeding and in cases where you or your ex are seeking to modify the court’s final order because you’re seeking to get expanded visitation, change conservatorship, etc.

In order for temporary orders to be entered by a court, a party must first file a petition or motion for temporary orders and there must be a hearing. In family law, often this is the first hearing that the parties will attend in front of a judge and it might even be the last one if the final order is agreed upon and all that is necessary is a judge’s signature.

Temporary orders are an important stepping stone in family law cases because they serve several purposes while the case is actually pending such as specifying conservatorship, visitation with the children, ordering a party to make payments of child or spousal support as well as debts and interim attorney’s fees. The court can also order who has possession of what property while the case is pending and where the parties are to live. Also, the court can forecast what is to come in the case and set deadlines for the parties to meet. Often times, the final orders are contingent upon these deadlines.